Map of Barn Locations

This map, which is similar to one which appears in the book, The Matanuska Colony Barns, shows the approximate locations of most of the remaining Colony barns. Adapted from an original map of the Colony tracts, which can be seen as 40 and 80-acre delineations, this map shows the roads as they existed circa 1935, rather than today’s highways and side roads. In the book the locations are notated and cross-referenced with each barn described in the book (a few barns located here do not appear in the book).

BarnsStarredMap

A few notes about the  locations, shown as stars on this map: All locations are approximate. The Larsh-Wilson barn, which later became the Linn-Breeden barn and was moved to the Alaska Museum of Transportation and Industry (MATI) north of Wasilla, is shown in its original location, as the current location is off the map. The Ed Wineck barn, which was moved to the Alaska State Fairgrounds in 1976, is shown in both the original location near Bodenburg Butte and at the fairgrounds. Various other barns are shown where they are now, but their original locations may be miles from there; a surprising number of these huge structures have been moved around the Valley for one reason or another. Sometimes, as with the Bailey and Loyer barns, they’ve only moved a few hundred feet from where they were built in 1936. Most of the barns are visible from public roads, but please remember to be courteous when visiting and always respect private property signs. The map was created by Helen Hegener. ©2013 Northern Light Media, all rights reserved.

History Lessons

Colonists line up to leave the St. Mihiel.(photo by Willis T. Geisman, Mary Nan Gamble Collection ASL-P270-195 Alaska State Library)

Colonists line up to leave the St. Mihiel.(photo by Willis T. Geisman, Mary Nan Gamble Collection ASL-P270-195 Alaska State Library)

Now that The Matanuska Colony Barns  is finished, I’ve been reflecting on what it has taken to pull this book together and get it into print. It’s been much more of a task than I imagined when the idea first crossed my mind, and it’s been many times more rewarding than I ever could have guessed.

This book is the culmination of 18 months of researching and exploring the history of the Matanuska Colony Project. My original intention was simply to collect images of the beautiful Colony barns in our valley and create a picture book which would bring smiles and enjoyment. I had no intention of delving into the history of the Matanuska Colony, but it quickly became apparent that the barns are an integral part of the history, and I could not write about the barns without including the history which gives them context and meaning.

Matanuska colonists at railroad station Palmer (photo by Willis T. Geisman, Mary Nan Gamble Collection ASL-P270-224 Alaska State Library)

Matanuska colonists at railroad station Palmer (photo by Willis T. Geisman, Mary Nan Gamble Collection ASL-P270-224 Alaska State Library)

When I began this work I knew only the bare essentials, that the United States government had brought some families to Alaska in the 1930’s and settled them near Palmer, and I knew that only a few of the barns built for these Colony families were still in existence. I’d taken many photographs of the picturesque Colony barns over the years, but I didn’t realize they were, with only a handful of exceptions, all built from the same blueprint. I didn’t know that the families who came north on a government troopship had been selected because they fit specific parameters, such as “It is preferable that there be three or four children, on average…” and “The family must consider the proposition as the opportunity of a lifetime.”

Colonists' camp from the top of the water tower in Palmer (Willis T. Geisman, Mary Nan Gamble Col. ASL-P270-112 Alaska State Library)

Colonists’ camp from the top of the water tower in Palmer (Willis T. Geisman, Mary Nan Gamble Col. ASL-P270-112 Alaska State Library)

Learning about the Matanuska Colony Project involved learning about an important part of the history of Alaska, as well as a surprising part of the history of this country. I’m sure that somewhere in my mostly boring history lessons there was a chapter or two on Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal, but nothing they taught me in school compared to what I learned in researching this book.

I learned that President Franklin Roosevelt took office at the height of the Great Depression in March, 1933, and when he declared in his inaugural address that “…the only thing we have to fear is fear itself,” he followed up his bold words and acted swiftly to try and stabilize the economy and provide jobs and relief to those who were suffering. Over the next eight years, the government instituted a series of experimental programs and projects, known collectively as the New Deal for America. Among these was a federal agency which relocated struggling families to communities planned by the federal government. The

Joseph Puhl assisted by three neighbors progresses rapidly on his cabin

Joseph Puhl assisted by three neighbors progresses rapidly on his cabin (Willis T. Geisman, Mary Nan Gamble Col. ASL-P270-293 Alaska State Library)

first of these communities, Arthurdale, West Virginia, became the pet project of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and over 100 others were
either planned or initiated by the Division of Subsistence Homesteads, the Federal Emergency Relief Administration or the Resettlement Administration.

It was difficult to find a balance between including enough of the history and sharing too much; this is a book about barns, after all. But I felt it was necessary to place the  Matanuska Valley Project in the context of this fascinating era, and my hope is the prelude which explains how and why the barns came to be here will instill a deeper appreciation and affection for those few remaining structures.

Barn Perspectives

Ferber Bailey barn, on original Colony tract number 152, at Moffit Road and the Glenn Highway, as seen from across the hayfields on the west end of Scott Road. The house is the original Colony house built in 1935.

The Virgil Eckert barn, one of the few barrel vault roofed barns, has been transformed into a home. It is on the original tract number 100, just south of Scott Road and the Glenn Highway.

The Virgil Eckert barn, one of the few barrel vault roofed barns, has been transformed into a home. It is on the original tract number 100, just south of Scott Road and the Glenn Highway.

The Ising-Dredseth double barn on Wes Grover's farm on the southeast end of Outer Springer Loop Road, as seen from across his hayfield to the west.

The Ising-Dregseth double barn on Wes Grover’s farm on the southeast end of Outer Springer Loop Road, as seen from across his hayfield to the west. Wes Grover also owns the Venne original Colony barn.

Loyer-Lake barn, original tract no. 62, on Outer Springer Loop Road, as seen from Robley Street.

Loyer-Lake barn, original tract no. 62, on Outer Springer Loop Road, as seen from Robley Street.

 

Raymond Griese barn, tract number 77, Outer Springer Loop Road

Raymond Griese barn, tract number 77, Outer Springer Loop Road

 

DePriest barn on Outer Springer Loop Road, note the addition/extension to accommodate the unusual side-entry doorway.

DePriest barn on Outer Springer Loop Road, note the addition/extension to accommodate the unusual side-entry doorway.

 

 

More Barn Photos

Earl Wineck barn, originally on tract no. 174 near Bodenburg Butte, now at the Alaska State Fairgrounds near Palmer. Photo by Eric Vercammen/Northern Light Media

Earl Wineck barn, originally on tract no. 174 near Bodenburg Butte, now at the Alaska State Fairgrounds near Palmer. Photo by Eric Vercammen/Northern Light Media

Arnold Havemeister barn on tract no. 167, on Bogard Road, east of Wasilla. Photo by Helen Hegener/Northern Light Media

Arnold Havemeister barn on tract no. 167, on Bogard Road, east of Wasilla. Photo by Helen Hegener/Northern Light Media

Lawrence Arndt barn on tract No. 190, Palmer-Wasilla Highway, west of Palmer. Photo by Helen Hegener/Northern Light Media

Lawrence Arndt barn on tract No. 190, Palmer-Wasilla Highway, west of Palmer. Photo by Helen Hegener/Northern Light Media

Larsh-Wilson barn, originally on tracts no. 31 and 32, now at the Museum of Alaska Transportation and Industry, Wasilla. Photo by Helen Hegener/Northern Light Media

Larsh-Wilson barn, originally on tracts no. 31 and 32, now at the Museum of Alaska Transportation and Industry, Wasilla. Photo by Helen Hegener/Northern Light Media

Leonard Bergan barn, tract no. 181, Bodenburg Loop Road, southeast of Palmer. Photo by Albert Marquez/Planet Earth Adventures

Leonard Bergan barn, tract no. 181, Bodenburg Loop Road, southeast of Palmer. Photo by Albert Marquez/Planet Earth Adventures

Lloyd Bell barn, tract no. 195, Doc McKenzie Road and Bodenburg Loop Road, southeast of Palmer. Photo by Helen Hegener/Northern Light Media

Lloyd Bell barn, tract no. 195, Doc McKenzie Road and Bodenburg Loop Road, southeast of Palmer. Photo by Helen Hegener/Northern Light Media

Just Some Barn Photos

Today I’m just happy that this book is finished, looking great, and will soon be available (May 10 is the official publication date), so I’m sharing a few photos, some are in the book, some aren’t…

Claire Patten barn, tract no. 49, just south of Palmer

Claire Patten barn, tract no. 49, just south of Palmer. Photo by Helen Hegener/Northern Light Media

Vasanoja barn, was on tract no. 79, finally fell in 2006. On Kalwies Road off the Springer System south of Palmer.

Vasanoja barn, was on tract no. 79, finally fell in 2006. On Kalwies Road off the Springer System south of Palmer. Photo by Helen Hegener/Northern Light Media

Puhl barn, tract no. 99, at the corner of Scott Road and the Glenn Highway, north of Palmer

Puhl barn, tract no. 99, at the corner of Scott Road and the Glenn Highway, north of Palmer. Photo by Helen Hegener/Northern Light Media

Barry barn, tract no. 140, on Campbell Road off the Palmer Fishhook Road, north of Palmer.

Barry barn, tract no. 140, on Campbell Road off the Palmer Fishhook Road, north of Palmer. Photo by Barbara L. Hecker

Kerttula barn, tract no. 134, fell in 2006, was at the corner of Palmer Fishhook and the Glenn Highway, north of Palmer. Photo by Dave Rose

Kerttula barn, tract no. 134, fell in 2006, was at the corner of Palmer Fishhook and the Glenn Highway, north of Palmer. Photo by Dave Rose

The Parks-Archer double barn, tract no. 189, on Bodenburg Loop Road southeast of Palmer. Photo by Helen Hegener/Northern Light Media

The Parks-Archer double barn, tract no. 189, on Bodenburg Loop Road southeast of Palmer. Photo by Helen Hegener/Northern Light Media

Pre-Publication Special

BarnsCvr1The Matanuska Colony Barns is scheduled for publication May 10, 2013 by Northern Light Media. The retail price of the book will be $29.00 (plus $4.50 postage & handling), but a pre-publication special is available until May 10: $24.00 (plus $4.50 postage & handling) for this beautiful book detailing the history of the Colony barns, magnificent reminders of the 1935 Matanuska Colony Project.

From the back cover: “Anyone who travels through the eastern part of Alaska’s dramatically beautiful Matanuska Valley soon finds a Colony barn enhancing the landscape. These striking Valley landmarks are the enduring legacy of an all-but-forgotten chapter in American history, when the U.S. government took a direct hand in the lives of thousands of its citizens, offering Depression-distraught farm families an opportunity to begin again in a far-off land with government financing and support. Central to every Colony farm was the barn, a core structure integral to the operation of these family farms.”

The Matanuska Colony Barns: The Enduring Legacy of the 1935 Matanuska Colony Project, by Helen Hegener, photographs by Eric Vercammen, Stewart Amgwert, Albert Marquez, Dave Rose, Joanie Juster, Ron Day and others. Foreword by Barbara Hecker. Introduction by James H. Fox. 140 pages, full color. ISBN 978-0-9843977-4-7. Includes Colonist families listing, maps, bibliography, resources, index.

To order via credit card or Paypal, CLICK HERE and send payment to helenhegener@gmail.com

To order via check or money order, mail to Northern Light Media, PO Box 298023, Wasilla, Alaska 99629

• Pre-publication price until May 10: $24.00 (plus $4.50 postage & handling)

• After May 10: $29.00 (plus $4.50 postage & handling)

All pre-publication book orders will be mailed from the publisher on May 10th.

The Book Cover

BarnCover2After going through hundreds of photos and dozens of front and back cover layout options, here is a first look at the final design for the cover of the new book.

The author and Earl Wineck talking about barns. (photo: Susan Patch)

The author and Earl Wineck, Jr. at the 2012 State Fair, talking about barns. (photo: Susan Patch)

The barn on the front is the Earl Wineck barn at the Alaska State Fairgrounds. This is a photograph I took at the end of the Fair last summer. At the invitation of my friend Joanie Juster, I spent many delightful hours in the Wineck barn, talking about the history of the barns, and watching the documentary film Joanie co-produced on the Matanuska Colony Project, Alaska Far Away, as she shared it each day. I gave a couple of slideshow presentations on the barns, and I was delighted to meet many wonderful people who also appreciate the old barns, including Earl Wineck, Jr., who talked his dad into donating their barn to the Fairgrounds.

Bailey/Estelle barn, 2008 (photo by Helen Hegener/Northern Light Media)

Bailey/Estelle barn, 2008

The Wineck barn also appears as the background image on the back cover. The upper image on the back cover is also my photograph, the Ferber Baily barn on Marsh Road, now owned by Richard Estelle.

NLMBarnLogoThe bottom image is the new logo for Northern Light Media, made from one of the art prints which my sister, Susan Patch, created from a photograph I took last summer of the Raymond Greise barn on Outer Springer Loop Road, south of Palmer.

The book is in the final stages of production and will be published the first week of May, 2013.